Video

The Spook Who Sat By The Door (1973, Ivan Dixon)

Shortly after it opened in theaters, the film vanished altogether — pulled by its distributor, some allege, bowing to pressure from the FBI. The narrative, about disciplined efforts to take down The Man through brain power and armed revolts, was intentionally controversial, and it doesn’t take a leap of the imagination to presume the film made those in certain corridors of power nervous enough to “disappear” the movie altogether.

- Nina Metz, Chicago Tribune

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everygame:

It’s been (slightly over) six months of Every Game I’ve Finished! Let’s take a brief break from my very serious only-game-posts rule to do a recap and some housekeeping.

First! I’m officially announcing this blog, and announcing it as an exp. ‘zine “joint.”

There’s a new exp. thing! It’s a tumblr where I write an article about, well, Every Game I’ve Finished. 27 articles are up right now, so please enjoy the archives and consider following along.

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3pm – 4pm: Putting Pixels on Paper – Game Zine RevolutionElizabeth Simins, Ashley Davis, Mathew Kumar, Matt Hawkins with moderator Adam HinesAt the same time as traditional game magazines are dying off, the last few years have seen a videogame zine renaissance. Featuring critical and personal writing on games, fan comics and illustrations and taking forms ranging from hand bound silk screen art objects to glossy full color magazines Our panel of experts discuss their own zine work, the movement in general and why physical zines are important in a time when publishing online has never been easier.

Probably worth mentioning that I’ll be taking part in this panel as part of the Comics. vs. Games 3 programming at this year’s TCAF, held at Bento Miso (862 Richmond Street West, Toronto) on Saturday May 10th, despite not having actually put out a zine since 2011. Free to attend!

3pm – 4pmPutting Pixels on Paper – Game Zine Revolution
Elizabeth SiminsAshley DavisMathew KumarMatt Hawkins with moderator Adam Hines
At the same time as traditional game magazines are dying off, the last few years have seen a videogame zine renaissance. Featuring critical and personal writing on games, fan comics and illustrations and taking forms ranging from hand bound silk screen art objects to glossy full color magazines Our panel of experts discuss their own zine work, the movement in general and why physical zines are important in a time when publishing online has never been easier.

Probably worth mentioning that I’ll be taking part in this panel as part of the Comics. vs. Games 3 programming at this year’s TCAF, held at Bento Miso (862 Richmond Street West, Toronto) on Saturday May 10th, despite not having actually put out a zine since 2011. Free to attend!

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vorpaldinger:

A game is a thing that, in playing with it, magnifies your presence. It is not a picture, it is not a story, it is not a flat thing, it is a place created out of the imagination of another person. It’s a little house you step inside, a conversation you have with an unseen builder.  

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mkultragames:


The Artsy Games Incubator: Animation Edition is a 6-week game making workshop for animators! The program is focused on artists with animation backgrounds who are interested in the creative possibilities of videogames, but who have little to no experience with programming or game making software. Participants will each make their own game, while being introduced to tools, guest mentors, and community resources that will further their exploration of the interactive medium. At the end of the program, they will also have the opportunity to showcase their work at TAAFI (Toronto Animation Arts Festival International) in June 2014. By making videogame creation more accessible to a wider variety of artistic practices, AGI: Animation Edition hopes to continue the exploration of game art beyond 8-bit pixels and ultra-realistic CGI, into more diverse and expressionistic territory.
PROGRAM DETAILSNumber of participants: 6Cost: FREE!
Toronto Animated Image Society1411 Dufferin St, Unit B (just north of Dupont)Runs every Thursday from APRIL 3 to MAY 8 (6 sessions)6:30 – 9:30 pm Coordinators: Matt Hammill (Asteroid Base) and Sagan Yee (Hand Eye Society) Contact: sagan@handeyesociety.com

The original run of the Artsy Game Incubator is one of the most important things that have ever happened for the Toronto games community, so it’s great to see it back, with a new “artform specific” concept: animation is the first, and a writing-focused incubator will follow in the fall. Apply here!

mkultragames:

The Artsy Games Incubator: Animation Edition is a 6-week game making workshop for animators! The program is focused on artists with animation backgrounds who are interested in the creative possibilities of videogames, but who have little to no experience with programming or game making software. Participants will each make their own game, while being introduced to tools, guest mentors, and community resources that will further their exploration of the interactive medium. At the end of the program, they will also have the opportunity to showcase their work at TAAFI (Toronto Animation Arts Festival International) in June 2014. By making videogame creation more accessible to a wider variety of artistic practices, AGI: Animation Edition hopes to continue the exploration of game art beyond 8-bit pixels and ultra-realistic CGI, into more diverse and expressionistic territory.

PROGRAM DETAILS
Number of participants: 6
Cost: FREE!

Toronto Animated Image Society
1411 Dufferin St, Unit B (just north of Dupont)
Runs every Thursday from APRIL 3 to MAY 8 (6 sessions)
6:30 – 9:30 pm
Coordinators: Matt Hammill (Asteroid Base) and Sagan Yee (Hand Eye Society)
Contact: sagan@handeyesociety.com

The original run of the Artsy Game Incubator is one of the most important things that have ever happened for the Toronto games community, so it’s great to see it back, with a new “artform specific” concept: animation is the first, and a writing-focused incubator will follow in the fall. Apply here!

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Do you think if I call this number I can still get an authentic Black Knight t-shirt for $14.95?

Do you think if I call this number I can still get an authentic Black Knight t-shirt for $14.95?

(Source: vgjunk)

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ultrace:

As an emulated game, Lucky & Wild is decent fun (the control scheme leaves a bit to be desired), but the ultimate experience here is truly in the arcade cabinet, which uses not only a steering wheel and gas pedal for driving, but two light guns for shooting. The expected way to play is that the first player drives and operates one gun while the second player takes aim with the remaining gun, but frankly, that’s a bunch of crap. The real thrill comes with the second player using both guns, akimbo-style, and truly living up to the “Wild” name while the first player tries to keep them both from ramming into that last fatal barrel. Want to get even crazier? Lucky & Wild actually lets three people play on just two credits if players two and three each take a gun. Sure, it’ll be a little crowded in the cabinet, but do not underestimate the hilarity involved.

Lucky & Wild is a brilliant drive/shoot-em-up on which Ultrace has a lot more to say than the excerpt above, but particularly that it was one of those games you just had to play in the arcade. In fact, I got irrationally excited while watching Why Don’t You Play in Hell? when I thought I spotted a Lucky & Wild machine in the back of the “Fuck Bombers” hangout.

I only got to play it a few times, and never even thought to have one player take both guns. Sounds brilliant (and considering how hard it was to drive and shoot at the same time, clever.)

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incrediblystrangegames:

When you think about the CPUs of classic gaming machines, chances are you think of the venerable MOS Technology 6502, which powered the NES (as well as the Apple II, the C64 and the Atari 800), or Federico Faggin’s triumph, the Z-80, which powered the TRS-80, the ZX-80/Timex Sinclair and the the ZX-80/Timex Sinclair and the GameBoy and GameBoy Color.*

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But spare a thought for the RCA 1802, an extremely weird 8-bit processor (its architecture is nothing like Z-80 or 6502, both of which are pretty similar) that can do things like run at super-low, non-standard clock speeds (like, it doesn’t need to always run at the same speed from instruction to instruction) and is so low powered that it is still used in Africa for pay phones, since it can be run on the power in the phone line alone. Oh, and it also spawned the first dedicated computer language for videogames…

Incredibly Strange Games is one of my favourite infrequently-updated tumblrs, based on the infrequently-published zine. Here’s a great post about an 8-bit processor I’d never even heard of!

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coryschmitz:

Logo for MK-ULTRA Games, my ol’ pal Mathew Kumar’s game studio.Client: MK-ULTRA Games

coryschmitz:

Logo for MK-ULTRA Games, my ol’ pal Mathew Kumar’s game studio.
Client: MK-ULTRA Games

(via mkultragames)

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mkultragames:

Hello!

We are MK-Ultra Games, Inc., a new games studio in Toronto. Yes, another one of those. We exist now! Officially! We are proud to announce that we exist (just did that) and that we’re working on Knight and Damsel, a new competitive puzzle platformer coming to OUYA in 2014.