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vorpaldinger:

A game is a thing that, in playing with it, magnifies your presence. It is not a picture, it is not a story, it is not a flat thing, it is a place created out of the imagination of another person. It’s a little house you step inside, a conversation you have with an unseen builder.  

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mkultragames:


The Artsy Games Incubator: Animation Edition is a 6-week game making workshop for animators! The program is focused on artists with animation backgrounds who are interested in the creative possibilities of videogames, but who have little to no experience with programming or game making software. Participants will each make their own game, while being introduced to tools, guest mentors, and community resources that will further their exploration of the interactive medium. At the end of the program, they will also have the opportunity to showcase their work at TAAFI (Toronto Animation Arts Festival International) in June 2014. By making videogame creation more accessible to a wider variety of artistic practices, AGI: Animation Edition hopes to continue the exploration of game art beyond 8-bit pixels and ultra-realistic CGI, into more diverse and expressionistic territory.
PROGRAM DETAILSNumber of participants: 6Cost: FREE!
Toronto Animated Image Society1411 Dufferin St, Unit B (just north of Dupont)Runs every Thursday from APRIL 3 to MAY 8 (6 sessions)6:30 – 9:30 pm Coordinators: Matt Hammill (Asteroid Base) and Sagan Yee (Hand Eye Society) Contact: sagan@handeyesociety.com

The original run of the Artsy Game Incubator is one of the most important things that have ever happened for the Toronto games community, so it’s great to see it back, with a new “artform specific” concept: animation is the first, and a writing-focused incubator will follow in the fall. Apply here!

mkultragames:

The Artsy Games Incubator: Animation Edition is a 6-week game making workshop for animators! The program is focused on artists with animation backgrounds who are interested in the creative possibilities of videogames, but who have little to no experience with programming or game making software. Participants will each make their own game, while being introduced to tools, guest mentors, and community resources that will further their exploration of the interactive medium. At the end of the program, they will also have the opportunity to showcase their work at TAAFI (Toronto Animation Arts Festival International) in June 2014. By making videogame creation more accessible to a wider variety of artistic practices, AGI: Animation Edition hopes to continue the exploration of game art beyond 8-bit pixels and ultra-realistic CGI, into more diverse and expressionistic territory.

PROGRAM DETAILS
Number of participants: 6
Cost: FREE!

Toronto Animated Image Society
1411 Dufferin St, Unit B (just north of Dupont)
Runs every Thursday from APRIL 3 to MAY 8 (6 sessions)
6:30 – 9:30 pm
Coordinators: Matt Hammill (Asteroid Base) and Sagan Yee (Hand Eye Society)
Contact: sagan@handeyesociety.com

The original run of the Artsy Game Incubator is one of the most important things that have ever happened for the Toronto games community, so it’s great to see it back, with a new “artform specific” concept: animation is the first, and a writing-focused incubator will follow in the fall. Apply here!

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Do you think if I call this number I can still get an authentic Black Knight t-shirt for $14.95?

Do you think if I call this number I can still get an authentic Black Knight t-shirt for $14.95?

(Source: vgjunk)

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ultrace:

As an emulated game, Lucky & Wild is decent fun (the control scheme leaves a bit to be desired), but the ultimate experience here is truly in the arcade cabinet, which uses not only a steering wheel and gas pedal for driving, but two light guns for shooting. The expected way to play is that the first player drives and operates one gun while the second player takes aim with the remaining gun, but frankly, that’s a bunch of crap. The real thrill comes with the second player using both guns, akimbo-style, and truly living up to the “Wild” name while the first player tries to keep them both from ramming into that last fatal barrel. Want to get even crazier? Lucky & Wild actually lets three people play on just two credits if players two and three each take a gun. Sure, it’ll be a little crowded in the cabinet, but do not underestimate the hilarity involved.

Lucky & Wild is a brilliant drive/shoot-em-up on which Ultrace has a lot more to say than the excerpt above, but particularly that it was one of those games you just had to play in the arcade. In fact, I got irrationally excited while watching Why Don’t You Play in Hell? when I thought I spotted a Lucky & Wild machine in the back of the “Fuck Bombers” hangout.

I only got to play it a few times, and never even thought to have one player take both guns. Sounds brilliant (and considering how hard it was to drive and shoot at the same time, clever.)

Link

incrediblystrangegames:

When you think about the CPUs of classic gaming machines, chances are you think of the venerable MOS Technology 6502, which powered the NES (as well as the Apple II, the C64 and the Atari 800), or Federico Faggin’s triumph, the Z-80, which powered the TRS-80, the ZX-80/Timex Sinclair and the the ZX-80/Timex Sinclair and the GameBoy and GameBoy Color.*

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But spare a thought for the RCA 1802, an extremely weird 8-bit processor (its architecture is nothing like Z-80 or 6502, both of which are pretty similar) that can do things like run at super-low, non-standard clock speeds (like, it doesn’t need to always run at the same speed from instruction to instruction) and is so low powered that it is still used in Africa for pay phones, since it can be run on the power in the phone line alone. Oh, and it also spawned the first dedicated computer language for videogames…

Incredibly Strange Games is one of my favourite infrequently-updated tumblrs, based on the infrequently-published zine. Here’s a great post about an 8-bit processor I’d never even heard of!

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coryschmitz:

Logo for MK-ULTRA Games, my ol’ pal Mathew Kumar’s game studio.Client: MK-ULTRA Games

coryschmitz:

Logo for MK-ULTRA Games, my ol’ pal Mathew Kumar’s game studio.
Client: MK-ULTRA Games

(via mkultragames)

Link

mkultragames:

Hello!

We are MK-Ultra Games, Inc., a new games studio in Toronto. Yes, another one of those. We exist now! Officially! We are proud to announce that we exist (just did that) and that we’re working on Knight and Damsel, a new competitive puzzle platformer coming to OUYA in 2014.

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"The point is that we could just chalk these differences in opinion over the movie up to a matter of druthers, but while everyone is certainly entitled to their opinion that does not mean that everyone is entitled to their opinion being right. That’s simply not what subjectivity is about, yet we make this mistake all the time. Just because opinions aren’t facts does not mean that some opinions aren’t more coherent, helpful and productive than others. And the obvious difference between ‘the gun fight is awesome!’ and the ‘perfect encapsulation of…’ is the quality of insight. It’s the ability to engage the text for its expressed purpose, and then their respective abilities to provide an educational process to the reader, far beyond the lame conclusion of bad/good within the opinion itself."


—Film Crit Hulk in “Intro #4” of his extensive article on Man of Steel. Said intro is worth reading at least, even if Hulk really has to stop using the “all-caps” style which ultimately infantilizes and mutes the strength and quality of opinion that he’s arguing for, here. Ironically, however, I can’t ever forgive him for calling Looper one of the best films of 2012. What a maroon!

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Hello! Last weekend at the Toronto Independent Game Jam I (Mathew Kumar, in case you’re lost) and a team of developersCapy's Vic Nguyen and Frankie Leung, Andrew Carvalho (previously of Queasy Games) and Shaun Hatton (offsite as “DJ Finish Him”)—created Knight and Damsel, which I describe as a “competitive two-player feminist puzzle platformer.”

As there’s been a bit of interest in the game since Vic shared some of his work online (including coverage from, of all places, Kotaku) I thought I should share some screenshots of the game being played and describe it (roughly.)

So! Knight and Damsel’s inspiration actually comes from a few places, but one worth mentioning is Feminist Frequency’s first Tropes vs. Women in Video Games video, Damsel in Distress. I’m not particularly interested in this context of debating the quality/value of the series, but one thing that struck me was an aside that in your average video game, if a princess is captured, she waits passively to be rescued. Yet for heroes, being captured is just another challenge to be faced (and heroes getting captured happens all the time. It’s basically all James Bond does.)

Hence the set-up: in Knight and Damsel, one player takes the role of the Knight, questing to save the Damsel, and one player takes the role of the Damsel, who can quite happily save herself.

The twist is: what is a knight without a damsel to save? To avoid losing face, the Knight must do what he can to stop the Damsel rescuing herself, something she isn’t too happy about. So we worked up some video game magic that allows the Knight and Damsel to affect each other’s screens by throwing the blocks, axes and bombs that litter the level onto the other’s screen, allowing them to hurt or trap their opponent, while, at the same time, doing their best to navigate further into the level before their opponent.

Both the Knight and Damsel are inevitably heading towards each other, however, and at this stage of the game it becomes a tense, shared-screen face-off, with the Knight attempting to grab the dodging Damsel before she can run back to town. Once the Damsel either rescues herself or is “rescued” scores are totted up based on who managed to get further (plus some bonuses) and either the Knight is praised by the unsuspecting townsfolk for his heroism, or the Damsel gains new respect for proving she didn’t need to be rescued at all.

And that’s the game! As we only had a weekend, it’s currently only a proof of concept, but one that (I feel) definitely works. The majority of the team have other obligations right now (Super Time Force, for example) but we are looking at ways we can take the time to not merely “finish” it as a jam game but polish and tune the play and add a bit more content to put it out properly. I personally very much hope that we can.

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venuspatrol:

New on Venus Patrol: Videogame Romantics T-shirts & More Now Available At The New Venus Patrol Shop

Honestly thought that Attract Mode (powered by Fangamer) had sold all of the last stock of exp., but after a mysterious sighting of the ‘zines at Venus Patrol/Wild Rumpus’ “All Other Parties are Still Trite and Dull”, it turns out there are still a few copies out there. So if you want copies this has to be your last chance.
Buy: minus one / zero / infinity

venuspatrol:

New on Venus Patrol: Videogame Romantics T-shirts & More Now Available At The New Venus Patrol Shop

Honestly thought that Attract Mode (powered by Fangamer) had sold all of the last stock of exp., but after a mysterious sighting of the ‘zines at Venus Patrol/Wild Rumpus’ “All Other Parties are Still Trite and Dull”, it turns out there are still a few copies out there. So if you want copies this has to be your last chance.

Buy: minus one / zero / infinity